Tag Archives: MacGyver

MacRecipes, nothing to do with Apples and everything to do with Angus


If you ever take a trip through The Periodic Table of Nerdery (and I highly recommend you do, because it’s funny and interesting) you will learn that many, many nerds look to Angus MacGyver as either a hero or favorite fictional nerd.

Now that you are armed with that knowledge, take a gander at the awesome that is MacRecipes. The website collects all the “recipes” MacGyver used to create the, er, inventions? I can’t think of a word for his creations, and danger-averting and/or crisis-avoiding mechanisms just seems awkward.

So yes, now, if you’re ever wondering how Mac stopped a sulfuric acid leak (chocolate bars), you’ve got a resource. However, there seems to be no recipe on how to create a majestic MacGyver mullet. My guess is it’s two 2 Salon Selectives Styling Mousse + 1 part Dippty Do, and just a touch of V05 hairspray for control and shine.

Great Moments in Nerdery: The name’s Jankov. Julius Andreas Gimli Arn MacGyver Chewbacka Highlander Elessar-Jankov

Julius Andreas Gimli Arn MacGyver Chewbacka Highlander Elessar-Jankov

Said Norwegian bus driver Andreas Jankov, who legally lengthened his name to Julius Andreas Gimli Arn MacGyver Chewbacka Highlander Elessar-Jankov (seen here displaying new drivers license): “I wanted to show that it is possible to be serious and at the same time take the name you like. I wanted to see how far I could take it with respect to the number of names.”

Mr. Jankov, we salute you. See you at a Vikings game?

35 best fictional nerds, in honor of Nerd Pride Day

As you know, yesterday was International Nerd Pride Day. Unfortunately, this year Nerd Pride Day was usurped here in the US by Memorial Day. At The Nerdery, we’re okay with that, because everyday is nerd pride day here. But in the interest of education and spreading the pride to those who don’t get to inhabit this building, we’re presenting you with a list of our favorite (and therefore the best, right?) fictional nerds.

macgyver
linus
chrisknight
underdog
scotty
brain

In no particular order:

  1. Doc Brown, “Back to The Future
  2. Sylar, “Heroes
  3. Hiro Protagonist, Snow Crash
  4. Underdog
  5. Tony Stark
  6. Chris Knight, “Real Genius
  7. Mouse, “The Matrix”
  8. Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye
  9. Donatello
  10. Data, “Star Trek: The Next Generation”
  11. Scotty, “Star Trek”
  12. Wash, “Firefly”
  13. Grissom, “CSI”
  14. Jordan Cochran, “Real Genius
  15. Bunsen Honeydew, “The Muppet Show”
  16. Beakman
  17. Lazlo Hollyfield, “Real Genius”
  18. McLovin, “SuperBad”
  19. Batman
  20. MacGyver
  21. Columbo
  22. Spider-man
  23. Bean, Ender’s Game
  24. Mike, Tony, and Cynthia, “Dazed and Confused
  25. Hubert Farnsworth, “Futurama”
  26. Marmaduke
  27. Bernard, Day of the Tentacle.
  28. Seraph, “Matrix Reloaded
  29. Dr. Manhattan, Watchmen
  30. Neo, “The Matrix”
  31. Linus, “Peanuts”
  32. Geordi La Forge, “Star Trek: The Next Generation”
  33. Ray Arnold, “Jurassic Park
  34. Brain, “Animaniacs”
  35. Jo, Little Women

Who’s your favorite fictional nerd?

Filed under Nerdery Culture

Profiles in Nerdery: Mark Seemann, he knows his Lucky Charms

  • Astrological Sign: Western: Gemini. Eastern: Rabbit. … I’m a split hare.
  • Time at the Nerdery:

  • Area of expertise: Breaking code, chess, breaking things, modesty, PHP hackery, arbitrary lists, puns, teh internets, cube mods, pick, poke, peek, games, fencing, counting, bughouse, jQuery, finding areas under curves, sounding smart, guessing, precision, luck, commas, ellipses…
  • When people ask you what you do, how do you respond: I start to explain the development process then hesitate, bring up recent projects and awesome coding tools, realize this is going way over their heads, simplify it to short and general statements pertaining to anthropomorphized scripts and happy little servers, reconsider my audience, then sigh audibly and say, “I make websites.”
  • Favorite kinds of projects to work on: Nothing brings more glee than finding the subtle hidden unanticipated trick to make a patch of code explode. Except maybe discovering a tight solution to a stubborn problem that’s been holding back a project. Or seeing and executing a forced checkmate in seven moves. Or a well-timed joke to make someone laugh then cry because she has a sore stomach from laughing too much already. Or maybe…
  • What one thing about The Nerdery surprises people the most when you tell them about it: There are dogs here at work. True, they may not have the cleanest code, their methods are a little unorthodox, but they get results.
  • Seven dream Jeopardy Categories: 1. Jeopardy Categories 2. Etymology 3. Fencing Tricks 4. The Erdos–Faber–Lovász conjecture 5. Lucky Charms Marshmallows 6. Random & Pointless Trivia 7. Transcendental Numerology
  • Favorite Fictional Nerd: I couldn’t think of one. I thought of many. In no particular order: Dr. Bunsen Honeydew, Angus MacG, Dr. Larry Kyle, Gyro Gearloose, Dr. Emmett Brown, Gune, Dr. Horrible, Jeff Albertson, Dr. Roy Hinkley, Richard Langley, Dr. Zefram Cochrane, Alan Turing, Richard Feynman, er whup, those aren’t fictional.
  • According to the Wikipedia entry on Nerd, some nerds show a pronounced interest in subjects which others tend to find dull or complex and difficult to comprehend, or overly mature for their age, especially topics related to science, disambiguation, mathematics and technology. Do you know what disambiguation is: If one traces the word back to its roots, the origins of the term are derived from the Greek: “etymon” meaning true sense, and “logy” meaning logic. Transcribed from Middle English as ethimologie, the phrase entered common… oh wait, that’s the etymology of “etymology”.

Profiles in Nerdery: Adam Gedde, bridging the gap between sales people and nerds

  1. Astrological Sign: Scorpio.
  2. Time at the Nerdery: Nearly 1 lunar cycle.
  3. Area of expertise: Interactive marketing, search engine marketing, and a bit of programming. I’m also vocally endowed.
  4. When people ask you what you do, how do you respond: I tell them I’m the bridge between the nerds and the sales people. I need to be able to understand the technology surrounding the solutions we provide for our clients, but I also have the opportunity to keep my digital consultant skills sharp.
  5. Favorite kinds of projects to work on: I like mash-ups – taking a bunch of existing, cool things….slapping them together….and building something completely new. That exercise used to be very difficult, but thanks to things like APIs, REST, and the maturation of digital development tools it’s much easier to do.
  6. What one thing about The Nerdery surprises people the most when you tell them about it: That we have this many nerds in one spot. I think there’s a law against that somewhere.
  7. Seven dream Jeopardy Categories: 1) Search Marketing Jargon; 2) Great Tenor Arias; 3) Beavers and Ducks – Quotable Movies; 4) Save the Cheerleader; 5) Save the World; 6) Farley-isms; and 7) History of Mountain Dew
  8. Favorite Fictional Nerd: MacGuyver, followed closely by Chuck Bartowski
  9. According to the Wikipedia entry on Nerd, some nerds show a pronounced interest in subjects which others tend to find dull or complex and difficult to comprehend, or overly mature for their age, especially topics related to science, disambiguation, mathematics and technology. Do you know what disambiguation is: That’s a trick question, isn’t it?

Profiles in Nerdery: Ryan Kucera, Credibility adder

  1. Astrological Sign: Taurus
  2. Time at the Nerdery: 4 years, 5 months
  3. Area of expertise: All aspects of Web application development
  4. When people ask you what you do, how do you respond: My standard response is, “I add technical knowledge and credibility to the sales efforts at Sierra Bravo.” When prompted for “Occupation” on a form, however, I still write in “Programmer.”
  5. Favorite kinds of projects to work on: I enjoy projects that are driven by the excitement and enthusiasm of the customer. No matter how challenging the timeline or technical scope, we always succeed when the developers and stakeholders share a common sense of excitement about launching the end product. Even if it’s something as seemingly mundane as online auto glass ordering, as soon as the client says, “We’re gonna turn this industry upside-down when this site launches!” I know we’re in for a fun and fulfilling project.
  6. What one thing about The Nerdery surprises people the most when you tell them about it: The fact that we allow dogs in the office surprises my friends and family the most. Then I explain that my dog isn’t allowed, which makes this fact more believable. (Dasher is a bit barky, nippy, and leaky; all bad traits for an office dog!) On the flip side, I expected more of my cycling friends to be impressed with our awesome bike-commuter friendliness (showers, indoor bike parking, general acceptance of stinky, sweaty cyclists…). To my surprise, many companies in the Twin Cities are equally accommodating.
  7. Seven dream Jeopardy Categories: Photoshop keyboard shortcuts; Acronyms of the Mpls/St. Paul bike routes; Airport Codes of Asia; Stephen King movie cameos; Scalix bugs and glitches; Regular Expression patterns; All-Wheel Drive station wagons of the early ’80′s
  8. Favorite Fictional Nerd: MacGyver. His name is still a verb in my vocabulary. As in “Damn, this fuse is blown, but the parts store is closed. Guess I’ll have to MacGuyver it with some tinfoil.” MacG was a master of solving problems pragmatically, always using technology and creativity over brute force. I like to think that these same qualities have made me an effective programmer and problem-solver throughout my career.
  9. According to the Wikipedia entry on Nerd, some nerds show a pronounced interest in subjects which others tend to find dull or complex and difficult to comprehend, or overly mature for their age, especially topics related to science, disambiguation, mathematics and technology. Do you know what disambiguation is: I see what you did there.

Friday Links: On CSS, Information Architects, and MacGyver

Read, Write, Web has a great post about a study that has found casual Internet use is good for kids. If you’re so inclined you can read the report, Living and Learning with New Media.

I really liked the 37signals piece on Defensive Design and anticipating where your customers/clients might slip-up and designing so that when they do slip-up it doesn’t have serious repercussions.

Ad Freak is enamored with Colle + McVoy’s new take on the Minnesota Lottery drawings.

The 90-9-1 Principle is about how users tends to participate in online social communities. The overarching theory is that 90% of the people lurk, 9% will add to something already created, and 1% actually do the creation. Interesting reading. [via]

Three Minds asks what’s next for Information Architects?

Web Controversy of the Week: Moms vs. Motrin. I don’t know about you, but I love this kind of stuff. It fascinates me on so many levels. First of all, I am surprised that people are paying such close attention to Motrin’s Web site. Second, I think this is a lesson in how fast a community can organize, especially when you piss off the moms. Third, it gives anyone who works in or with the media a real-life example of how to deal with a very public backlash against you.

It’s Friday, have a little fun, watch 100 movies spoiled in under five minutes. Warning, there are spoilers. This reminds me of that one Threadless t-shirt (sadly, it’s sold out).

Feeling a little MacGyvery? Try to make your own speakers using a few paper cups and some ear buds.

Speaking of, the Vitamin piece “Tables: The next evolution in CSS Layout” compares Web designers to modern-day MacGyvers.

Okay, I saw this all over the Internet this week, but it took me until like the sixth mention to actually watch the video. It’s a viral marketing video for Guitar Hero featuring a a kid playing “Prisoner of Society” by The Living End on his bike. You have to watch to understand it. It’s pretty cool (even if it is a big ol’ advertisement).

So what were you reading on the Internet this week?

Filed under Links