NerdCast #43: iOS Developer Reaction to Apple’s New iPhone

NerdCast iOS

In this episode of the NerdCast we talk with two iOS developers here at The Nerdery about today’s announcements at Apple Headquarters, in which they announced two new iPhone models and gave some insights into the final build of iOS 7 that is being released on September 18th. Find out what this means for App development and what these new hardware specs can do for the next generation of Apps.

HostRyan Carlson

Guests: Jon Rexeisen & Jay Peyer, iOS Developers at The Nerdery

Listen Now:
Running Time: 0:21:42 / Subscribe on iTunes


NerdCast #29: There And Back Again – A Developers Tale

WWDC NerdCast Coverage Album ArtIn this episode of The NerdCast we follow up with Jon Rexeisen, a principle software engineer from the nerdery that has been at WWDC all week. We have an in depth discussion about the challenges that will arise in updating old apps and the design implications of iOS7. This discussion will be insightful for business owners, mobile designers, and app developers alike.

Host: Ryan Carlson

Guests: Jon Rexeisen, Senior Developer at The Nerdery

Have an App or Want to Build an App?

Do you have an iOS development project or do you want to discuss being iOS 7-ready? Submit your project details.

Listen Now:
Running Time: 0:22:28 / Subscribe on iTunes


Businesses That Ignore iOS 7 Risk Loss of App Standing and Marketshare

iOS 7 New Visual DesignsAs we look back over the many sessions attended the week, the biggest takeaway by far is that iOS 7 is a design overhaul. With iOS 7, Apple is removing superfluous UI (goodbye skeuomorphism!) and refocusing on the user’s content. A preview on some of the new iOS 7 designs can be seen on their website.

In one session, Apple said they started over with a blank slate for each built-in app, with the goal to determine the focus of each app. As painful as it will be, this is something app designers and owners will want to do as well.

iOS 7 tells us that that the focus needs to shift back to the user’s content — the UI should be “unobtrusive and deferential”.

  • Do you have too many buttons?
  • Multiple ways to do the same thing?
  • Features that aren’t commonly used?
  • UI that distracts?

Continue reading Businesses That Ignore iOS 7 Risk Loss of App Standing and Marketshare

3 Things iOS Nerds Took Away From The WWDC 2013 Keynote

wwdc13-about-mainEvery year thousands of software developers wait for the coveted tickets for Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) to go on sale. This year it sold out in 71 seconds. Of those lucky shopping-cart jockeys, two Nerdery employees got golden tickets to attend the conference in California. Follow these Nerds on Twitter by following the #wwdcnerds hashtag.

For the rest of us watching from home, we streamed of the keynote on the big screen from the comfort of our bean bags in The Luke J Bucklin Memorial Nerditorium. Our Nerdery audience cheered on the praise-worthy features and announcements, made snarky comments about iCloud (so did they fix it this time?), and had insightful side conversations about what the future holds for developers – and how the features might be integrated into future projects.

Continue reading 3 Things iOS Nerds Took Away From The WWDC 2013 Keynote

Tech Talk: Learning New Tricks, My Mac Experience (Developer Edition)

Developers at The Nerdery have a lot of choices to make when they start their new job. Although having a dozen different types of cereal in the cafeteria to choose from seems like a big decision to make, it rarely impacts their work performance. Each employee has a decision to make over their choice of workstation and development tools.

Scott Carpenter shares his experience when he joined the ranks of code-ninjas here at The Nerdery and how he made a very adventurous choice to “try something new”.

Learning New Tricks, My Mac Experience
by Scott Carpenter

An email from The Nerdery after I accepted the job:

“Let us know what you want to use, Mac or PC, and what software you’ll need so we can have everything ready when you start.”

Not entirely unexpected, and this is as it should be, but, what a refreshing statement! It told me, you’ll have some freedom of choice here. (Unlike the scenario where you’re not even allowed to set your browser’s home page, which has happened to me and was less than empowering.)

Well, what did I want to use? I’ve used Windows since slightly before Win 95 launched, and at home, exlusively GNU/Linux since 2008. I’m comfortable and productive with both, and was aware that Ubuntu might even have been a valid choice, but I thought: maybe it’s time to see what this Mac business is all about. Macs have good hardware and are pretty. And they have Unix under the hood, right? Okay then.

I had some doubts on my first day when I realized, I don’t know how to use this computer. This is a building full of smart people, and I’m new, and I don’t even know how to use my machine. But a computer is a computer. You know what you should be able to do; you just have to find out how to do it on this weird fruity machine. Luckily there is this thing called The Google, and there were my fellow Mac-using newbs to help me with things like finding the power button.

So what happens when you start using a Mac? I’m going to focus on a couple of keyboard-related problems you’ll run into immediately, especially if you’re a developer that uses the keyboard a lot, and you spend a lot of time in various editing windows. I’ll give you a couple of sanity-saving and life-improving tips.

But first we should talk about balance. In particular, when configuring a machine, whether hardware or software. I’ve learned there’s something to be said for accepting the defaults when possible. It simplifies your life and saves time by reducing the endless customization you’ll tend to do.

But then again, tinkering is fun. And we’re all different. It’s not just about how Steve wanted you to use a computer. It’s also about your needs, and your feelings. Instead of saying, “You shouldn’t want to do that,” or asking, “If you want it to work like Windows, why don’t you use windows?”, let’s fix the glitch.

The first thing is fairly simple, having to do with this strange “command” key. There is a control key on the outside left and right positions on a Mac keyboard, as is proper, but it’s not like the control key you know. Instead, the peculiar “command” button has usurped most of its power.

This turns out to be okay. Many of the key combos you’re used to work just fine with command. But. It’s in the wrong place. So the first thing you’ll want to do is swap the command and control buttons in “System Preferences… > Keyboard > Modifier Keys…”

It may be helpful at first to re-label the keys to remind you of the change:

mac keyboard with labels on alt and cntrl keys
This developer’s properly configured and labeled Mac keyboard.

(We’ll pause for a moment to allow for weeping from native Mac users.)

The next thing we’ll fix is the atrocious behavior of the “home” and “end” keys.

By default, the home key will scroll to the top of your document, but leave the cursor wherever it’s at. End will likewise scroll to the end. This is completely unacceptable. Here is what our fingers have been trained to use:

Home Move cursor to beginning of current line.
End Move cursor to end of current line.
Shift + Home Select text from cursor to beginning of line.
Shift + End Select text from cursor to end of line.
Ctrl + Home Move cursor to beginning of document.
Ctrl + End Move cursor to end of document.
Shift + Ctrl + Home Select text from cursor to beginning of document.
Shift + Ctrl + End Select text from cursor to end of document.

I found a nice solution, which I’ve extended after a bit more research. I like this method because it doesn’t require a third-party program, and it can be set per user.

You’ll need to edit the default key bindings file:


On my machine, the KeyBindings dir and the DefaultKeyBinding.dict didn’t exist, so I just created them. Add the entries below:

    /* Remap Home / End to Appropriate Behavior */
    /* Home */
    "\UF729"   = "moveToBeginningOfLine:";
    /* End  */
    "\UF72B"   = "moveToEndOfLine:";
    /* Shift + Home */
    "$\UF729"  = "moveToBeginningOfLineAndModifySelection:";
    /* Shift + End  */
    "$\UF72B"  = "moveToEndOfLineAndModifySelection:";
    /* Cmd + Home */
    "@\UF729"  = "moveToBeginningOfDocument:";
    /* Cmd + End  */
    "@\UF72B"  = "moveToEndOfDocument:";
    /* Shift + Cmd + Home */
    "@$\UF729" = "moveToBeginningOfDocumentAndModifySelection:";
    /* Shift + Cmd + End  */
    "@$\UF72B" = "moveToEndOfDocumentAndModifySelection:";

(Note that we’re using the command key in place of control, since we moved it to the correct position on the outside.)

You’ll need to restart an open application to use the new bindings in that app, and it doesn’t work in all applications. For example, it doesn’t work in the built-in Terminal program, but in there, you can go to “Preferences > Settings > Keyboard” and set home = \\033OH and end = \\033OF. (Make action = “send string to shell:”)

Side note: In Terminal, the command key doesn’t assume the control key’s duties. Your fingers will often forget this, pressing Command (AKA pseudo-Control) + C or D, and you’ll wonder why your program doesn’t stop.

Bonus tip: Your fingers also may want to use Ctrl + arrow keys to move left and right one word at a time, and also to use “shift” to select the words. For that:

    /* Cmd + Left */
    "@\UF702"  = "moveWordBackward:";
    /* Cmd + Right */
    "@\UF703"  = "moveWordForward:";
    /* Shift + Cmd + Left */
    "@$\UF702" = "moveWordBackwardAndModifySelection:";
    /* Shift + Cmd + Right */
    "@$\UF703" = "moveWordForwardAndModifySelection:";

(Again with Cmd because we’ve moved it into the Ctrl spot.)

More useful info here.

I also spent time learning new habits and adjusting to “what is,” but these changes to “what should be” helped me feel much more comfortable in the new environment, along with getting a proper ergonomic keyboard and trackball:

Complete computer setup with dual monitor
Now we're iComputing!

It’s been a lot of fun. OS X is built on Unix, and you can be happy “doing it wrong” by hanging out in the ugly and gross command line underworld. I found myself wanting to keep learning and playing with my new toy at home over the weekend. I missed it. It’s a beautiful machine, and I love to learn and explore new things. I suddenly realized I was looking at the price of new iMacs. I kinda want one for home, too.

Steve’s revenge!

Scott Carpenter was first introduced to programming in 1981 when Scott’s dad, an electrical engineer, gave him his first computer to encourage his interest in programming. It worked – in 1998 Scott graduated from St. Cloud State University with his Bachelor of Science in business computer information systems. Scott went on to work for Cargill for 15 years as a software developer where he focused on application integration, integration design and development. In 2013, Scott’s journey brought him to The Nerdery where he puts his technical expertise to use as a PHP, WordPress and Java developer.

Think Ink: Color Unleashed; an iPhone app created with And Partners

And Partners, a brand experience company in New York, had a cool idea for their client, Neenah Paper, Inc. They conceived and designed an iPhone app that lets users peruse color combinations to create palettes, shades and hues of their choice – and order paper samples.thinkink

When asked what he thought was cool about this project, The Nerdery’s Mike Woods got right to the point: “It’s a frickin’ iPhone app,” said the software development manager. “No, seriously, this app was amazing. We built some custom UI components, and built interface gateways to process orders and authenticate users. We also did some complex color calculations and other nerdery.”

Think Ink, a free iPhone application, helps users find colors using the Dewey Color System, the world’s only validated, color-based personality testing instrument. It scientifically predicts the recognized major psychometric personality factors without language – it’s practical application being a reliably quick reference tool for the correlated brand attributes of colors.

“During the creative process, the paper is often a decision that is left until the end,” said Woods. “This application was made to help a designer pick some simple coordinating colors for a given color and then offer recommended paper for the product to be printed on.”

And Partners was a great partner. They provided very detailed wireframes and workflow documents,” added Woods. “These made it very easy to communicate about features and organize the project development. And Partners was always willing to listen to our UI and iPhone Human Interface Guidelines feedback. It’s great to work with a partner that can give you amazing designs and is willing to collaborate with you during development.”

“It’s likewise great working with a team of dedicated, competent, professional developers and project managers who are constantly striving to make the best possible application. Michelle, Jon, Minh and Blago are all amazing people to work with.”

Color me impressed.