Cyber Security Q&A: How NOT to get Hacked

With all the press surrounding security breaches lately, you might be wondering how it’s possible for your business to operate without getting hacked. We sat down with one of our security experts, Senior Quality Assurance Engineer Chris Wade to ask what you need to know about cyber security, hackers and how to protect your business and yourself.

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Security on the Client-side

Whether in a desktop browser or the embedded webview of your favorite social media app, your website is a battleground. Keeping your users and their data safe is one of the most difficult (but important) problems to solve when creating any Internet-connected product. There’s plenty to be done to ensure that data stays safe server-side, but your first and last line of defense is client-side.

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Quality Assurance Pro Tips – Learn from Apple’s recent HealthKit bug

Many of you already know the buzz going on with iOS 8 and some critical issues which occurred with Apple’s first iOS 8.0.1 software update on Wednesday, September 24th. A major bug with the HealthKit feature was discovered prior to the iOS 8.0 release, which resulted in Apple pulling all HealthKit enabled apps from the App Store ahead of the public release, leaving 3rd-party devs uncertain as to the fate of their Apps.

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Developing for Next Generation Touchscreen Computers

More than just Mobile Devices: Where touch detection breaks down

When you think of “touch,” mobile phones and tablets may immediately come to mind. Unfortunately, it’s far too easy to overlook the newest crop of touch-driven devices, such as Chromebook laptops that employ both a touchscreen and a trackpad, and Windows 8 machines paired with touchscreen monitors. In this article, you’ll learn how to conquer the interesting challenges presented by these “hybrid” devices that can employ both mouse and touch input. In the browser, the Document Object Model (DOM) started with one main interface to facilitate user pointer input: MouseEvent. Over the years, the methods of input have grown to include the pen/stylus, touch, and a plethora of others. Modern web browsers must continually stay on top of these new input devices by either converting to mouse events or adding an additional event interface. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that dividing these forms of input – as opposed to unifying and normalizing – is becoming problematic when hardware supports more than one method of input. Programmers are then forced to write entire libraries just to unify all the event interfaces (mouse, touch, pen, etc). So how did mouse and touch events come to be separate interfaces? Going forward, are all new forms of input going to need their own event interface? How do I unify mouse and touch now?

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Apache Configuration for Testing WordPress REST API on Secured Sites


It’s not uncommon to encounter a few roadblocks during a project and the typical next-step might involve doing a quick Google search for the answer. Unfortunately there are occasions in which we are on own with a unique problem. In this case we had to roll up our sleeves and discover the answer that works. We hope this helps the next person looking for this answer.

“I spent a bit of time reading documentation and testing and getting increasingly frustrated.”

I ran into an interesting problem this week. I have a staging site in active development that needs to remain behind a firewall, but we plan to use the WordPress REST API to serve content from the site to iOS and Android Apps. Unfortunately, for the API to work Continue reading Apache Configuration for Testing WordPress REST API on Secured Sites

Features Most Likely to Break When Upgrading to iOS 8 and What to Plan For

An experienced quality assurance (QA) engineer will have their spidey-senses tingling with every announcement of a new OS version, hardware refresh, or browser update. These are all good things for innovation, it just means we all need to be ready for launch day by starting to plan today. Continue reading Features Most Likely to Break When Upgrading to iOS 8 and What to Plan For

DataImportHandler: Recreating problems to discover their root

When a client asked me to address the performance problems with their Solr full-imports (9+ hours), I knew I was going to have to put on my computer-detective hat.

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Mapmaker, Mapmaker, Map Me a (Google) Map

So you want to embed Google Maps in your website. Maybe you have a list of locations you want to display, or perhaps you need to provide directions or perform simple GIS operations. You’re a pragmatic person, so you don’t want to reinvent the wheel.  You’ve settled on Google Maps as your mapping platform, acquired your API key, and you’re raring to go. Awesome! I’m so excited! Google Maps has great bang for the buck, and their API is well documented and easy enough to use.  But there’s a downside. Google Maps has become the Power Point of cartography.

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Implementing responsive images – a worthwhile investment, says money/mouth in unison

Responsive images are hard. At least for now anyways. The good news is a community of incredibly smart people have been working hard at providing a solution to this problem.

So what’s the problem?

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Building a Single Page Web Application with Knockout.js

Back in June of 2013 I was contacted by Packt Publishing to ask if I was interested in producing and publishing a video tutorial series after they saw a video of a live presentation I gave here at The Nerdery.  I was a little hesitant at first, but after after some encouragement from Ryan Carlson, our Tech Evangelist, I went for it.

“Building a Single Page Web Application with Knockout.js” is a video tutorial series that guides the user through building a fully functional application using Knockout.js. The tutorial itself is aimed towards both back-end and front-end web developers with the assumption that the viewer has a basic level of familiarity with HTML/CSS/JS.

I designed the tutorial with the purpose of not only teaching the Knockout.js library, but also to introduce software architectural elements that are helpful when building a full-blown single page application. Knockout.js works really well with an architecture and structure more commonly seen in back-end development while using front-end technology, so the melding of the disciplines is something that many aren’t used to. When people start out with Knockout, they often end up building applications that aren’t scaleable. The tutorial we made focuses on application architecture for scalable websites using Knockout.js.  This results in architecture (or lack thereof) that isn’t scalable in complexity.

The production took much longer than anticipated and other life events caused me to not have enough time to finish producing the videos in a timely fashion. It was at this point that I reached out to my fellow nerds, and Chris Black volunteered to help complete this endeavor. He did a fantastic job of recording and editing the videos to submit to the publisher. For anyone attempting a similar task, we found Camtasia was a very useful tool for this.

Here is a sample of the video we made